Staggered hours

Having different start, finish and break times from other workers.

Tara Hutton

Tara Hutton

Policy Advisor, Business Engagement

Employer: Government Equalities Office (GEO)
Sector: Public Sector

Staggered hours

 

I returned to work after a five year break caring for my child who had additional health needs.  Despite my confidence being low, it was important for me to return to work, and more importantly to build my career again.  Before I did this, my partner and I discussed the level of balance we wanted to achieve for our family. He works in an industry with a long hours culture, and we agreed that whilst the availability of flexibility would be a key factor in my decision making process, he would also challenge established thinking to work as flexibly as he could, as we both wanted to ensure we spent time with our children each working day.

My current working pattern is a four day week with one day working from home, which will increase to two days working from home from September.  I also work staggered start and end times which I co-ordinate with my partner to ensure that one of us is there for school drop off and home for dinner and bed-time; we usually agree the plan on a Sunday evening according to diaries.  Good communication with my line manager and my team have been key to the success of this. I have also been able to take unpaid parental leave during part of the summer holidays to allow me to spend quality time with my children, again with planning and preparation with my team and line manager.

This pattern is working for us, I am engaged and productive at work as I feel that I am able to be involved in career building projects whilst being a hands on mum and likewise for my partner.  I have no doubt that our flexible working needs will change as our family grows, however I am confident that this is something we will be able to continue to manage sensibly with good communication and employer support.

 

Vivien Kelly

Vivien Kelly

Language Consultant

Employer: True & Good
Sector: Marketing

Working from home and remote working Staggered hours

“Being offered this kind of flexibility has meant that I am able to be part of the workforce and still meet some of my caring responsibilities. This is very important to me – intellectually, emotionally and financially.

In offering flexible working, companies can cheaply access an experienced and enthusiastic talent pool. There are millions of people who are unable to commit to a conventional, full-time job, and yet who are skilled, experienced and keen to work. Companies who can offer them employment will build a loyal, productive, efficient and diverse workforce. We know that there is a positive, measurable correlation between teams who embrace cognitive diversity and teams who exhibit high performance levels.

The successful company of the future will clearly be a company with a wide range of working patterns worked by a wide range of individuals.”

Peter

Peter

Head of Global Mobility

Employer: Compass Group PLC
Sector: Food Services & Hospitality

Working from home and remote working Staggered hours

“My wife works full time and has little flexibility during work hours. I start in the office early and finish early in order that I can get home at a reasonable time to help with after school activities for our children.

I also work one day a week from home so that I can be available to pick up from school and get the children fed before they have to go on to other activities so that my wife can have at least one day working later at work if required.

This flexibility in my working arrangements is a great help to our family; cutting back on commuting time and costs, plus the environmental benefit of less mileage means it positively impacts both my engagement with the business, but also my overall feeling of wellbeing.

Performance in the business is not measured by hours in the office so such flexible arrangements are in no way a barrier to success.”

Mike Collins

Mike Collins

Policy Manager

Employer: Ministry of Justice
Sector: Public Sector

Staggered hours

“As a working dad, negotiating a flexible working arrangement has been essential in helping me to juggle my caring responsibilities with my career. The Ministry of Justice was one of the first government departments to introduce a family friendly working initiative: Finding a Balance and I was immediately struck by the number of male role models who were showcased. This programme enabled me to negotiate a bespoke pattern, with the full backing of my managers.

I was able to spend time with growing family in the mornings and make sure they were safely dropped at the nursery and at school, which meant a 10:30 start at work due to a long commute into London. My team and managers were aware of my commitments and meetings and targets were simply scheduled for later in the working day. It took a little getting used to but now huge numbers of staff work bespoke patterns – so I’m pleased to say – flexibility in the new norm!”

Jack Lamacraft

Jack Lamacraft

Managing Director

Employer: The Park London
Sector: Marketing

Working from home and remote working Staggered hours

“I start early and finish early, work remotely and work from home one day a week. This allows me to pick my daughter up from nursery every evening. On the day I work from home I take her in a little later and pick her up earlier.

We have collaboration hours between 10am and 4pm – try not to schedule any meetings outside of those hours, our clients know this and respect it (where possible).

It’s important that as a Director the other staff see that this is something we’re genuine about, it’s not just words on a page.

People are measured on output, not the amount of hours they spend sitting at a desk (we had one project manager working with us who was based in Southampton).”

Barbara Collins

Barbara Collins

Head of Women in Leadership, Cabinet Office

Employer: Civil Service, GEO
Sector: Public Sector

Staggered hours FEATURED

“As a mother of four children, the ability to work flexibly has always been important, but this became critical when my youngest child left nursery and all my children were at school. I was fortunate enough to have a really enlightened manager – who was willing to think and act flexibly – and he agreed to a personalised flexible full-time working pattern, which enabled me to start work early in the morning (7:00) and leave in the afternoon to collect the children from school. We also agreed a back-up plan when occasional urgent afternoon work emerged, but the ability to pick issues up later in the evening largely solved any problems. This early-early arrangement worked for the family because my husband (who works for the Ministry of Justice) was able to negotiate a complementary late-late pattern and look after the children in the mornings.

We all benefitted: my husband felt fully engaged with caring for the children; I have been able to support my children with their studies and after-school activities; and, the children (now in their twenties) never considered us to be working parents. This pattern wouldn’t work for everyone and is ideally suited to couples. The early mornings are sometimes tough and the days are busy and long. Nevertheless, it has been rewarding to share the care and has enabled us both to progress in our careers.”

Amie Esson

Amie Esson

Senior Estimator

Employer: Willmott Dixon
Sector: Construction

Working from home and remote working Staggered hours

“I considered going part time after my daughter was born, but technology and a culture of trust and openness at Willmott Dixon have enabled me to work flexibly and stay full time. Being able to start earlier and finish earlier means I have more time in the evenings to be with my family. It gives me a chance to catch up on my daughter’s day before she goes to bed. Also working from home now and then allows me to drop my daughter off at Nursery so that I can be involved with her education and development too.

I admit that I felt a little guilty about leaving early at first but after a few weeks it became the norm and now others in my office are starting to work similar patterns.

I think agile and flexible working are moving in the right direction and that different ways of working are becoming more accepted in construction. Since my return there is now a structured return process in place that eases parents back into the work environment and culture. I believe more can be done in the way of peer support from other parents through potential parent networks.”

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